Billie Swamp Safari

The Florida Everglades, rich in history, beauty and culture, are also home to some of the most magnificent creatures the North America has to offer; birds. As the only subtropical preserve in all of North America, the Everglades provides the most significant breeding grounds for tropical wading birds. Here, more than 350 different species of birds have been seen, including bitterns, storks, even endangered species like the ultra-rare Snail Kites. So, the next time you venture to the Florida Everglades, don’t forget to bring your binoculars, camera, sunscreen and bird field identification book. Role in Nature Ecologically, birds assist the environment in so many ways. Some birds aid in plant reproduction through pollination or seed dispersion, and others provide a host body for parasites. Birds naturally sustain population levels and serve as food after death, much like any other species. The most common rule of thumb in the Everglades is, the healthier

Millions of people flock to South Florida each year, a few more at this time of year. While the beaches and golf courses are fantastic, many come to the Everglades to see the majesty of a subtropical ecosystem in action. Everyone wants to see an alligator (or 10). Many people ask, “when is the best time of year to see the Everglades.” The Seminole guides at Billie Swamp Safari will tell you, “there is never a bad time to visit the Everglades!” You see, The Everglades are 734 square miles big and nature and wildlife are in full swing 365 days a year. Essentially the Everglades has two seasons, and both offer great opportunities to connect with nature (and see a few gators). Less Insects, More Animals The Everglades has a dry season and a wet season. The dry season is from December to April, where the water levels and temperatures drop

When visitors come to the Florida Everglades they are sure to see all kinds of local wildlife. From butterflies to alligators, our guests should expect to encounter a few of the famous local wildlife that everyone has seen on the National Geographic channel It’s all part of the Florida Everglades adventure experience! Our Everglades wildlife needs room to move. It’s best to bring a pair of binoculars to get close to animals in their natural habitat. All our wildlife needs space to retreat if necessary. Most importantly, never, ever chase an animal! Recognize the signs of alarm: Wild animals are just that… wild. Increased movements such as flapping, pacing, tense muscle movement, staring, or vocalization may mean you are too close. If you feel like an animal is disturbed, back away. Enjoy animals in their natural environs and try not to disturb their natural movements. Remember, Everglades visitors are just that,

The Florida Everglades is extraordinary feat of nature! Once you come here, it’s easy to see why people come from all over the world to take a journey through the wetlands. With unique vegetation and fantastic wildlife, the Everglades must be seen up close, and in person. But with as much attention as the ecosystem has been getting lately, there’s still much to learn about its contribution to South Florida and the people that live here.