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Conserving and protecting the Florida Everglades and its wildlife is a top priority for the Seminole Tribe. It’s been said that “the land and Seminoles are one, and if the land perishes, then so do the Seminoles.” With countless species of animals, many endangered or threatened, it’s easy to see why so many groups, both private and public work towards this goal. A wetland of international importance, the Everglades is one of the last natural environments in the United States where families can enjoy sightseeing, adventure and more. There aren’t many landscapes as spectacular in America as the Florida Everglades. An impressive aquatic ecosystem covering more than 18,000 square miles, the Florida Everglades is a natural marvel. It also home to a plethora of plants and animals - some threatened or endangered. Aside from its natural beauty, the ecosystem provides millions of South Floridians with drinking water and is a vital

Billie Swamp Safari still has two terrific Halloween events going on through October 31st, but they will be gone before you know it. Make plans now to join us on Seminole Big Cypress Reservation and Billie Swamp Safari to join in the fun. If being scared to death is your idea of Halloween fun, then Eerie Nights in the Swamp will have you hiding under the covers! For families with younger children, Safari Harvest Festival is the perfect choice to come to the Florida Everglades for spooky Halloween fun. We have something for everyone, but time is running out. Tickets for both events are available at www.billieswamp.com or by calling 1-800-GO-SAFARI.   Billie Swamp Safari Presents Eerie Nights in the Swamp ONLY 3 days left - Oct. 26, 27 & 31 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM LEGENDS SWAMP BUGGY NIGHT RIDES Stories of Native Legends, creepy tales, & myths Starting at $30  HAUNTED HIKE Walk down

When visitors come to the Florida Everglades they are sure to see all kinds of local wildlife. From butterflies to alligators, our guests should expect to encounter a few of the famous local wildlife that everyone has seen on the National Geographic channel It’s all part of the Florida Everglades adventure experience! Our Everglades wildlife needs room to move. It’s best to bring a pair of binoculars to get close to animals in their natural habitat. All our wildlife needs space to retreat if necessary. Most importantly, never, ever chase an animal! Recognize the signs of alarm: Wild animals are just that… wild. Increased movements such as flapping, pacing, tense muscle movement, staring, or vocalization may mean you are too close. If you feel like an animal is disturbed, back away. Enjoy animals in their natural environs and try not to disturb their natural movements. Remember, Everglades visitors are just that,

The Florida Everglades has existed for thousands of years - not only as home to thousands of animals and other natural plants, but also to the main water supply for eight-million people in south Florida. Over the last century, the Everglades landscape has changed dramatically. Urban development and drainage projects reduced the Everglades to nearly half its original size - this has greatly affected critical habitats, polluted waters and brought invasive species to the area. In the early 1800’s, the ancestors of the Seminole Tribe of Florida were driven by the policies of the American military into the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp of South Florida – later known as Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation. Never surrendering, the Seminoles took refuge in remote areas that the American government regarded as uninhabitable, living a life shaped by fluctuating water conditions. Today, more than ever, The Florida Everglades faces continuing challenges of outside

South Florida is known for abundant sunshine all year long. While our winter season is very popular with retirees and vacationers from the north, it is also very crowded.  Fall happens to be a wonderful season to visit the Big Cypress Reservation and the Florida Everglades.  Noticeable changes in the air and color of the leaves, the seasonal changes in the Everglades mean variation in wildlife activity and water levels. There are some benefits of taking a Florida Everglades trip in the fall months, and here’s why: 1. The Weather As the sunshine state, it’s no surprise that South Florida temperatures can get hot most of the year. However, fall in South Florida means temperatures drop a few degrees, making conditions in our Everglades setting a little more comfortable – especially for those who aren’t used to the heat like South Florida natives. The lower temperatures are usually accompanied by an enjoyable