Florida Everglades Tourism Tag

  Before the theme parks and the high-rise apartments that guard the beaches, Florida was the wild. That wild still exists today in the Florida Everglades. Quite frankly, there may be no wilderness in America greater than the Everglades. Here crocodiles, alligators and manatees still swim in miles of rivers and streams, and more than 300 species of birds make their nests among the largest mangrove ecosystem in the Western Hemisphere.Known as the "river of grass" the Everglades were the first U.S. national area set aside for its biodiversity. Nine ecosystems, ranging from coral-lined bays to oak tree islands, support a network of plants and animals that can't be found anywhere else on earth. Here are the best ways to explore the Florida Everglades Biking Shark Valley's 15-mile tram and bike loop cuts through a flat-as-plywood freshwater ecosystem of sawgrass marsh and tree islands. No need to worry about hills in the Florida Everglades. At Shark

The Florida Everglades is extraordinary feat of nature! Once you come here, it’s easy to see why people come from all over the world to take a journey through the wetlands. With unique vegetation and fantastic wildlife, the Everglades must be seen up close, and in person. But with as much attention as the ecosystem has been getting lately, there’s still much to learn about its contribution to South Florida and the people that live here.

The Florida Everglades is extraordinary feat of nature! Once you come here, it’s easy to see why people come from all over the world to take a journey through the wetlands. With unique vegetation and fantastic wildlife, the Everglades must be seen up close, and in person. But with as much attention as the ecosystem has been getting lately, there’s still much to learn about its contribution to South Florida and the people that live here.

The Florida Everglades is extraordinary feat of nature! Once you come here, it’s easy to see why people come from all over the world to take a journey through the wetlands. With unique vegetation and fantastic wildlife, the Everglades must be seen up close, and in person. But with as much attention as the ecosystem has been getting lately, there’s still much to learn about its contribution to South Florida and the people that live here.